Health

7 Cereals Can No Longer Claim ‘Healthy’ Label Under FDA Rule

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Oct. 13, 2022 — Generations of Americans grew up being told that breakfast cereals like Corn Flakes and Raisin Bran were healthy ways to start their days.

But now, under new federal guidelines, those cereals and other mainstays of the breakfast table can no longer make that claim.

The guidance was proposed after the White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health, “as well as the release of the related national strategy, which aims to end hunger, improve nutrition and physical activity, reduce diet-related diseases and close disparity gaps by 2030,” the FDA wrote in a press release.

To be considered “healthy,” foods must meet certain criteria. The FDA used cereal as an example to illustrate how the guidelines affect how food will be presented to consumers.

For that “healthy” label, cereals need three-fourth ounces of whole grains and no more than 1 gram of saturated fat, 230 milligrams of sodium, and 2.5 grams of added sugars, CNBC reported.

Here are seven common American brands that don’t meet the “healthy” label standards:

  • Raisin Bran (9 grams of added sugars)
  • Honey Nut Cheerios (12 grams of added sugars)
  • Corn Flakes (300 milligrams of sodium; 4 grams of added sugars)
  • Honey Bunches of Oats, Honey Roasted (8 grams of added sugars)
  • Frosted Mini Wheats (12 grams of added sugars)
  • Life (8 grams of added sugars)
  • Special K (270 milligrams of sodium; 4 grams of added sugars)

“Nutrition is key to improving our nation’s health,” said Xavier Becerra, Health and Human Services secretary. “Healthy food can lower our risk for chronic disease. But too many people may not know what constitutes healthy food. FDA’s move will help educate more Americans to improve health outcomes, tackle health disparities and save lives.”

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